Families of Hostages Held in Gaza Storm Israel’s Parliament Demanding Deal for Release

Families of Hostages Held in Gaza

Families of Hostages Held in Gaza, JERUSALEM (AP)— Dozens of family members of Hamas hostages stormed a committee meeting in Israel’s parliament Monday, demanding a deal to secure their loved ones’ release, as European foreign ministers joined growing international calls for Israel to negotiate the establishment of a Palestinian state following the conflict.

Families of Hostages Held in Gaza Storm Israel’s Parliament Demanding Deal

Families of Hostages Held in GazaThe developments underscored the growing strain on Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who has dug in on both fronts.

He has maintained to the Israeli public that continuing the destructive offensive in Gaza is the only way to bring the hostages back home. At the same time, he has rejected the US proposal for a postwar resolution, stating that he will never accept a Palestinian state.

JERUSALEM (AP)— Dozens of family members of Hamas hostages stormed a committee meeting in Israel’s parliament Monday, demanding a deal to secure their loved one’s release, as European foreign ministers joined growing international calls for Israel to negotiate the establishment of a Palestinian state following the conflict.

People built graves for the deceased in the yard of Al-Nasser Hospital, which has been a fighting zone for weeks, as staff tried to deal with dozens of newly murdered and wounded, including children.

According to healthcare workers, strikes hit at least four schools sheltering displaced persons on the city’s western outskirts, including two inside a seaside strip proclaimed a safe zone for those escaping Israel.

Gaza’s internet and phone networks were down for the tenth time on Monday during the conflict. The continuous blackouts have seriously hampered the provision of aid, which is critical for the survival of the territory’s 2.3 million people,

according to UN authorities. The lack of service also inhibits Palestinians from communicating with one another and the outside world.

Following the Oct. 7 attack in southern Israel that sparked the war, Netanyahu has vowed to continue the offensive until “complete victory” against Hamas and to return all remaining hostages.

Around 1,200 people were murdered in the attack, and Hamas and other militants kidnapped approximately 250 individuals.

Israelis are increasingly divided about whether it is possible to achieve either.

In November, a weeklong cease-fire accord liberated approximately 100 hostages in exchange for the release of Palestinian prisoners held by Israel. Around 130 people remain imprisoned, but a number have been confirmed killed.

Hamas has stated that it will release additional detainees only in exchange for an end to the fighting and the liberation of thousands of Palestinian inmates.

Netanyahu has ruled down such an agreement, but hostage families are becoming increasingly angry. Relatives and other demonstrators set up a tent camp outside Netanyahu’s home in Jerusalem, vowing to stay until a deal is struck.

On Monday, scores of hostage family members burst into the Knesset’s finance committee meeting, holding up placards and shouting, “You won’t sit here while they die!”

“These are our children!” they exclaimed. Some had to be forcefully restrained, and at least one individual was escorted away.

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